The Best Rooftop Bars in NYC

When the sweltering heat hits the New York City streets, locals and tourists alike head up, literally. All around town are rooftop bars with plush couches for enjoying a relaxing drink while admiring the view and catching a cool breeze. But don’t get stuck at the tourist-heavy spots!

The Next Big Tuscan Wine Region: Montecucco

Chianti. Montalcino. Bolgheri. Montepulciano. Carmignano. Gimignano. For a province about as big as New Jersey, Tuscany is home to some of the most famous areas for wine, and for good reason. And yet, there are still Tuscan wines to be “discovered,” like those coming from Montecucco.

The Guide to the Best Provence Rosé

Memorial Day Weekend is the official start of summer. Hot days by the lake, beach trips, and long weekends in the country are at hand, and for many of these seasonal outings, Provençal rosé will be served. Here's our guide to the best.

Umbria, The Easier One-Day Trip Out of Rome

While quick trips from Rome to the heart of Tuscany are doable, you’ll get a better feel for the classic Italian countryside, ancient hilltop towns, and, of course, traditional dishes like porchetta, by heading to the much closer Umbria aka Italy’s “Green Heart.”

Sangiovese, Italy's Most Famous Grape

Italian wine has a well-defined hierarchy. Barbera and Nebbiolo rule Piemonte, while Prosecco-bound Glera and Pinot Grigio are the stars in the northeast. And then there’s Tuscany’s Sangiovese. The grape and its clones are behind numerous deep-red wines from the luxurious Brunello di Montalcino to your common Chianti.

Rosé Wines From Beyond Provence

Warm spring days mean it is “rosé all day” time. But if you’ve been turned off by some of the South of France plonk that’s found its way into many a frosé over the past few summers, we highly recommend looking for others. There is a rosé for everyone.

Spring Wines for Your Spring Lamb

Tender lamb is the cornerstone of many a spring menu. Its gamey flavor brings a certain richness to entrées that is very welcome after a winter of meat and potatoes. Of course, it also requires a different wine that what you’ve been drinking all winter.

After Merlot, There's Cabernet Sauvignon

After getting your fill of the classic red wine flavors from Merlot and Pinot Noir, your first taste of the hard stuff is sophisticated Cabernet Sauvignon. The wine plays a very important role in both the Old and New World, especially in California. It’s also often the first step up the “fancy wine” ladder mostly because it’s pricey, but also due to its nuances.